Examples of Electron Configuration

We explain that what are examples of electron configuration? Electrons in ground state atoms occupy the lowest energy sublevels first . As a way to represent this arrangement concisely was needed, the so-called electron configuration was established . To explain how electron configurations are written, we start with the simplest atom, which is hydrogen (H).

A hydrogen atom has only one electron. As long as that electron is in its lowest energy state (the so-called ground state), it will be in the first energy level, which has only one sublevel: the 1s. The electron configuration of hydrogen is then written as 1s 1 . The superscript , which in this case is 1, indicates the number of electrons present in that 1s sublevel.

AUFBAU principle

The AUFBAU Principle or construction principle is the series established to detail all the locations where electrons can be placed in the atom. It comprises from energy level 1 to level 7, and the sublevels: s, p, d, f. It is represented with a diagram of diagonal lines that tells in what order they should be written.

s p d F
k = 1 1s
l = 2 2s 2 P
m = 3 3s 3p 3d
n = 4 4s 4p 4d 4f
o = 5 5s 5 p 5 d 5f
p = 6 6s 6p 6d 6f
q = 7 7s 7p 7d 7f

Finally, the whole series that obeys the diagonal lines is as follows:

1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p, 4s, 3d, 4p, 5s, 4d, 5p, 6s, 4f, 5d, 6p, 7s, 5f, 6d, 7p, 6f, 7d, 7f

The sublevel s can contain a maximum of 2 electrons.

The p sublevel can contain up to 6 electrons.

The d sublevel can carry 10 electrons.

The sublevel f can contain a maximum of 14 electrons.

Electronic configurations of elements

The electronic configuration of chemical elements is based on their atomic number , whose symbol is Z. The atomic number is the number of electrons in an atom. It is the same as the number of protons , since negative charges are offset by positive charges.

The lithium (Li) has three electrons: two in the first energy level and a third electron should be in the sublevel s of the second energy level. The electron configuration of lithium Li is 1s 2 2s 1 . In the case of the lithium ion Li +, you simply remove the single valence electron from 2s and write 1s 2 .

The Beryllium has four electrons; its electron configuration is 1s 2 2s 2 . The boron has five electrons: two in the sublevel 1s, two 2s and one sublevel in the 2p sublevel. The electron configuration of boron is 1s 2 2s 2 2p 1 . The three electrons of the second energy level of boron (2s and 2p) are valence electrons .

The 2p sublevel, with three p orbitals, can contain a maximum of six electrons (two per orbital). The electron configurations of boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, and neon require that the 2p sublevel be occupied by electrons, 1 and 6 respectively. In the case of neon, the 2p sublevel, and therefore the second energy level, is completely full. Its electron configuration is 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 .

The electron configurations of all the elements in a column (or family) of the periodic table conform to a pattern: they have the same number of valence electrons . An electron configuration can show concisely the number of electrons in each sublevel of an atom, but an orbital diagram is used to represent the distribution of electrons within the orbitals.

Examples of electron configuration

  • Hydrogen (Z = 1): 1s 1
  • Helium (Z = 2): 1s 2
  • Lithium (Z = 3): 1s 2 2s 1
  • Beryllium (Z = 4): 1s 2 2s 2
  • Boron (Z = 5): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 1
  • Carbon (Z = 6): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 2
  • Nitrogen (Z = 7): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 3
  • Oxygen (Z = 8): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 4
  • Fluorine (Z = 9): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 5
  • Neon (Z = 10): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6
  • Sodium (Z = 11): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 1
  • Magnesium (Z = 12): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2
  • Aluminum (Z = 13): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 1
  • Silicon (Z = 14): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 2
  • Phosphorus (Z = 15): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 3
  • Sulfur (Z = 16): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 4
  • Chlorine (Z = 17): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 5
  • Argon (Z = 18): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6
  • Potassium (Z = 19): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 1
  • Calcium (Z = 20): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2
  • Scandium (Z = 21): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 1
  • Titanium (Z = 22): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 2
  • Vanadium (Z = 23): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 3
  • Chromium (Z = 24): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 4
  • Manganese (Z = 25): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 5
  • Iron (Z = 26): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 6
  • Cobalt (Z = 27): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 7
  • Nickel (Z = 28): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 8
  • Copper (Z = 29): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 9
  • Zinc (Z = 30): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10
  • Gallium (Z = 31): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10  4p 1
  • Germanium (Z = 32): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 2
  • Arsenic (Z = 33): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 3
  • Selenium (Z = 34): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 4
  • Bromine (Z = 35): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 5
  • Krypton (Z = 36): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6
  • Rubidium (Z = 37): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 1
  • Strontium (Z = 38): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2
  • Yttrium (Z = 39): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 1
  • Zirconium (Z = 40): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 2
  • Niobium (Z = 41): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 3
  • Molybdenum (Z = 42): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 4
  • Technetium (Z = 43): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 5
  • Ruthenium (Z = 44): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 6
  • Rhodium (Z = 45): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 7
  • Palladium (Z = 46): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 8
  • Silver (Z = 47): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 9
  • Cadmium (Z = 48): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 10
  • Indian (Z = 49): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 10 5p 1
  • Tin (Z = 50): 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 3s 2 3p 6 4s 2 3d 10 4p 6 5s 2 4d 10 5p 2

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Check Also
Close
Back to top button