Definition and types of software compiler

Definition

A compiler is a software program that transforms high-level source code written by a developer in a high-level programming language into low-level object code (binary code) in machine language that can be understood by the user. processor.

What is it for?

A compiler is a program that is used to translate the source code of another program from a programming language into executable code. The source code is usually in a high-level programming language (eg Pascal, C, C++, Java, Perl, C#, etc.). Executable code can be a sequence of machine instructions that can be executed directly by the CPU, or it can be an intermediate representation interpreted by a virtual machine (for example, Java bytecode).

How does it work?

A compiler converts a program from a human-readable format (source code) to a machine-readable format (executable code). Compilers unite source programs in high-level languages ​​with the underlying hardware. For the compiler to work, it requires:

  • Determine the correctness of the syntax of programs.
  • Generate correct and efficient object code
  • Organize at runtime
  • Form the output according to the assembler.

Example

The following is a conceptual example of source code being converted to assembly language and machine code by the compiler:

Source code
IF COUNT=10
GOTO END-OF-JOB
ELSE
GOTO COMPUTE-AGAIN
ENDIF

machine assembly language
Compare A to B     Compare 3477 2883
If equal go to C   If = go to 23732
Go to D            Go to 23119

Machine
code 10010101001010001010100
10101010010101001001010
10100101010001010010010

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